H-2 Antigens pp 415-428 | Cite as

Role of MHC Class I Antigens in Tumor Rejection

  • Suzanne Ostrand-Rosenberg
  • Geoffrey A. Cole
  • Gerald A. Cole
  • Michael Nishimura
  • Virginia Clements
  • Hilde Cheroutre
  • Stephen HuntIII
  • Iwona Stroynowski
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 144)

Abstract

The mouse H-2 or major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encodes a series of antigens that are centrally involved in immune responses. The K and D MHC class I antigens are highly polymorphic glycoproteins expressed on the surface of most nucleated cells, and consist of a 45 KD heavy chain noncovalently associated with a 12 KD protein, beta-2-microglobulin (B2m). Genetic differences between MHC class I antigens of graft donor and recipient result in allogeneic graft rejection. MHC class I antigens are also required for T cell mediated recognition of virally infected (Zinkernagel and Doherty 1979) or modified self cells (Shearer 1974).

Keywords

Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigen Expression Tumor Rejection Teratocarcinoma Cell Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigen 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Suzanne Ostrand-Rosenberg
    • 1
  • Geoffrey A. Cole
    • 1
  • Gerald A. Cole
    • 2
  • Michael Nishimura
    • 1
  • Virginia Clements
    • 1
  • Hilde Cheroutre
    • 3
  • Stephen HuntIII
    • 3
  • Iwona Stroynowski
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Biological SciencesUniversity of Maryland Baltimore CountyCatonsvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of Maryland at BaltimoreBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.Division of BiologyCalifornia Institute of TechnologyPasadenaUSA

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