H-2 Antigens pp 267-273 | Cite as

Transgenic Mice: New Systems for Studying the Function of MHC Class II Molecules

  • Gabrielle Lang
  • Philippe Gerber
  • Jan Bohme
  • Beatrice Durand
  • Jorg Fehling
  • Marianne Le Meur
  • Corinne Marfing
  • Christophe Benoist
  • Diane Mathis
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 144)

Abstract

Transgenic mice have great potential as systems for studying the function of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. Several mouse lines that bear a wild-type E alpha transgene have been created and characterized. The transgene is expressed efficiently, accurately, and with tissue-and cell type-specificity. The recipient (E alpha negative) strain is endowed with new immunological capabilities; namely, it can now respond to E-restricted antigens. Other transgenic lines have been created by injecting E alpha clones that harbor promoter deletions. These mice display novel patterns of E alpha expression eg absent on B cells, but present on peripheral macrophages and in the thymus; or absent in the thymic cortex but present in the medulla. These mice may provide new insights into tolerance induction, MHC restriction etc.

Keywords

Major Histocompatibility Complex Transgenic Line Major Histocompatibility Complex Class Expression Major Histocompatibility Complex Thymic Cortex 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gabrielle Lang
    • 1
  • Philippe Gerber
    • 1
  • Jan Bohme
    • 1
  • Beatrice Durand
    • 1
  • Jorg Fehling
    • 1
  • Marianne Le Meur
    • 1
  • Corinne Marfing
    • 1
  • Christophe Benoist
    • 1
  • Diane Mathis
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut de Chimie Biologique - Faculte de Medicine11, rue HumanStrasbourgFrance

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