Guanidines pp 83-92 | Cite as

Biosynthesis of Guanidinoacetic Acid in Isolated Rat Hepatocytes

  • Kazumasa Aoyagi
  • Shoji Ohba
  • Mitsuhiro Miyazaki
  • Sohji Nagase
  • Satomi Iida
  • Mitsuharu Narita
  • Shizuo Tojo

Abstract

Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA), a precursor of creatine, is formed from arginine and glycine by transamidinationl. GAA formation in rat is not detected in liver homogenates2 or in isolated perfused livers3. Therefore, creatine synthesis in rat liver is regulated by the activity of transamidinase in the kidney4. However, recent improvements in GAA analysis reveal that the blood level is 1/4 of the value6 reported previously3. Moreover, Natelson et al. reported that isolated rat hepatocytes had GAA synthetic activity5. The details of which are not clear. Therefore, GAA synthesis in isolated rat hepatocytes was investigated quantitatively to evaluate the role of its synthesis in liver. In addition, some regulatory mechanisms in this synthesis were also investigated.

Keywords

Sodium Lactate Performance Liquid Chromatographic Analysis Creatine Synthesis GUANIDINOACETIC Acid Public Health Bureau 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    H. Borsook and J. W. Dubnoff, The formation of glycocyamine in animal tissues, J. Biol. Chem. 138: 389 (1941).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    J. B. Walker, Formamidine group transfer in extracts of human pancreas, liver and kidney, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 73: 241 (1963).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    G. B. Gerber, G. Garber, T. R. Koszalka and L. L. Miller, The rate of creatine synthesis in the isolated, perfused rat liver, J. Biol. Chem. 237: 2246 (1962).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    J. B. Walker, Matabolic control of creatine biosynthesis, J. Biol. Chem. 236: 493 (1961).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    S. Natelson, H-Y Tseng and J. E. Sherwin, On the biosynthesis of guanidinosuccinate, Clin. Chem. 24-: 2108 (1978).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    H. Mikami, Y. Orita, A. Ando, M. Fuji, T, Kikuchi, K. Yoshihara, A. Okada and H. Abe, Metabolic pathway of guanidino compounds in chronic renal failure in:“Urea cycle disease,” A. Lowenthal, A. Mori and B. Marescau, eds., Plenum, New York (1983).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    M. N. Berry and D. S. Friend, High-yield preparation of isolated liver cells, J. Cell Biol. 43: 506 (1969).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    R. N. Zahlten, W. S. Frederick and H. A. Lady, Regulation of glucose synthesis in hormonesensitive isolated hepatocytes, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 70: 3213 (1973).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Y. Yamamoto, T. Manji, A. Saito, K. Maeda and K. Ohta, Ion-exchange chromatographic separation and fluorometric determination of guanidino compounds in physiological fluids, J. Chromatogr. 162:327 (1979).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    J. B. Walker, Metabolic control of creatine biosynthesis, J. Biol. Chem. 235: 2357 (1960).PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kazumasa Aoyagi
    • 1
  • Shoji Ohba
    • 1
  • Mitsuhiro Miyazaki
    • 1
  • Sohji Nagase
    • 1
  • Satomi Iida
    • 1
  • Mitsuharu Narita
    • 1
  • Shizuo Tojo
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Internal Medicine, Institute of Clinical MedicineUniversity of TsukubaSakura-mura, Ibaraki-ken 305Japan

Personalised recommendations