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Growth and Skeletal Maturation of Mexican Children 4 to 7 Years, with and Without Diagnoses of Chronic Protein-Energy Malnutrition

  • Francis E. Johnston
  • Janet Sharko
  • Joaquin Cravioto
  • Elsa De Licardie
Chapter

Abstract

While we now know a great deal about the course of growth which accompanies the imposition of protein-energy malnutriation upon the very young, as well as interactions of an individual with the surrounding environment, there are still gaps in our knowledge which need to be filled. One such gap deals with the course of growth beyond early childhood. For example, in children subject to chronic PEM, is there any catch-up in development among those who survive the critical 2nd and 3rd years of life? Or, among those whose growth failed in the 2nd or 3rd years due to chronic PEM, are deficits which remain later in childhood similar across different variables? Cross-sectional studies offer some suggestions, but longitudinal data are required to answer such questions.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francis E. Johnston
    • 1
  • Janet Sharko
    • 1
  • Joaquin Cravioto
    • 2
  • Elsa De Licardie
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Instituto Nacional de Ciencias y Tecnologa de la Salud del NiñoMéxico

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