Algal Symbiosis and Its Recognition in the Fossil Record

  • Richard Cowen
Part of the Topics in Geobiology book series (TGBI, volume 3)

Abstract

Symbiosis describes an association between two organisms that is of benefit to both. The association is generally long-term rather than transitory, and one or both partners have structural and/or behavioral adaptations that foster the association. In extreme cases of symbiosis, the reproductive systems of the partners are linked, so that continuation of the symbiosis is almost automatic; in these cases there are strong analogies with the meiotic sexual cycle (Margulis, 1980; Knoll, this volume).

Keywords

Fossil Record Scleractinian Coral Planktonic Foraminifera Ventral Valve Dorsal Valve 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard Cowen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of GeologyUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA

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