The Experimental-Clinical Interface: Kindling as a Dynamic Model of Induced Limbic System Dysfunction

  • K. E. Livingston

Abstract

In this symposium we have looked back over a span of 40 years to trace the evolution of the limbic system concept from its rather nebulous beginnings to its present substantive reality. No longer can the limbic system be looked upon as the “foggy concept” to which Brodal referred less than 10 years ago (Brodal, 1969).

Keywords

Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Seizure Activity Limbic System Procaine Hydrochloride Seizure Development 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1978

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  • K. E. Livingston

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