Conditioning pp 307-317 | Cite as

Studies of Auditory Cortex in Behaviorally Trained Monkeys

  • M. H. GoldsteinJr.
  • D. A. Benson
  • R. D. Hienz
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 26)

Summary

Single-unit studies of neurons in the primary auditory cortex (AI) and surrounding belt areas of behaviorally trained rhesus monkeys are summarized. Responses of single cells to brief acoustic stimuli were recorded while the behavioral state of the animal was alternated between two different performing conditions or between a performing and a non-performing condition. In one study of 196 units the alternated performing tasks consisted of localizing one of 5 sound sources versus simply detecting the presentation of the same sounds. The second study concerned selective attention to one ear vs. the other. Stimuli were presented randomly to one ear or the other and monkeys were required to respond only to the stimuli in one ear, with the ear to be attended changed after a block of trials. For all comparisons more units showed no change than change. When responses in the Localize vs. Detect tasks were compared 8% of the units showed significant changes, and 29% of the units showed a change when these two tasks were compared to the non-performing condition. When monkeys selectively attended either left- or right-ear stimuli, only 18% of the population showed a statistically significant change between these two tasks, whereas 44% of the units showed a change when both attend conditions were compared with the non-performing conditions. Generally when there was a change in a unit’s response to a given sound, the change was in strength of response, not in response pattern. Changes in evoked single-unit activity were not accompanied by changes in spontaneous activity.

Keywords

Sound Source Auditory Cortex Detect Task Primary Auditory Cortex Speaker Location 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Abeles, M. and Goldstein, M. H., Jr., 1977, Multispike train analysis, Proc. of the IEEE, 65: 762.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  4. Goldstein, M. H., Jr. and M. Abeles, 1975, Single unit studies of the auditory cortex, in: “Handbook of Sensory Physiology,” W. D. Keidel and W. D. Neff, eds., Springer-Verlag, New York.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. H. GoldsteinJr.
    • 1
  • D. A. Benson
    • 1
  • R. D. Hienz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biomedical EngineeringJohns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA

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