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Photon Echo Polarization Measurements in SF6 and SiF4

  • W. M. Gutman
  • C. V. Heer
Conference paper

Abstract

The photon echo technique has become a valuable experimental tool for studying molecular processes. The polarization of the photon echo was first studied theoretically and experimentally by Abella et al. [1]. They studied the photon echo stimulated in ruby by exciting pulses from a ruby laser. Gordon et al. [2] studied the polarization of the photon echo stimulated in gaseous SF6 by the P(20) laser line of CO2. They used their experimental results and theoretical arguments to make inferences about the total angular momentum or the J-values of the levels which were involved in the absorption of the radiation. They did not observe a component of the echo polarization perpendicular to the polarization of the second pulse. Some of their conclusions were in error. Alimpiev and Karlov [3] studied the echo polarization with a linear-linear excitation sequence, and with excitation by P(16) were able to observe a small echo polarization component perpendicular to the second pulse polarization. Although their theoretical development was applicable only to states with small J-values, they concluded that P(16) radiation was absorbed by a Q-branch transition in SF6. They did not observe the perpendicular component with P(18) and P(20) excitation.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. M. Gutman
    • 1
  • C. V. Heer
    • 1
  1. 1.The Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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