Progressive Relaxation Then and Now

Does Change Always Mean Progress?
  • Paul M. Lehrer
  • Robert L. Woolfolk
  • Nina Goldman

Abstract

Edmund Jacobson died on January 7, 1983, at the age of 94. A psychologist and physician by training, he made important early contributions to the fields of psychophysiology, psychosomatics, and bio-electronics. He devised one of the most widely used self-control techniques in the overlapping fields of behavior therapy, behavioral medicine, and self-regulation: progressive relaxation. This chapter was stimulated by reflecting on Jacobson’s contributions and evaluating some of his ideas and empirical contributions in light of current concerns and controversies in the various fields in which he worked. In it we shall contrast Jacobson’s original progressive relaxation technique with some of the “revised” progressive relaxation techniques that have been developed over the years. We shall argue that some of these methods are so fundamentally different from Jacobson’s that they require entirely different rationales, and we shall hypothesize that they have very different effects.

Keywords

Behavioral Medicine Cognitive Therapy Muscle Tension Relaxation Training Tension Headache 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul M. Lehrer
    • 1
  • Robert L. Woolfolk
    • 2
  • Nina Goldman
    • 2
  1. 1.UMDNJ-Rutger’s Medical SchoolPiscatawayUSA
  2. 2.Rutgers—The State UniversityNew BrunswickUSA

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