Mechanisms of Biofeedback Control

On the Importance of Verbal (Conscious) Processing
  • J. Michael Lacroix

Abstract

A young woman sitting alone in a small room watches a television screen which provides her with an analog on-line display of her heart rate, and, presumably using the information provided on the screen, attempts to raise and lower her heart rate appropriately when cued to do so by the letter R or the letter L shown in the upper left-hand corner of the screen.

Keywords

Operant Conditioning Motor Program Target Response Verbal Library Baseline Session 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Michael Lacroix
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychology, Glendon CollegeYork UniversityTorontoCanada

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