Anion Transport in the Nervous System

  • H. K. Kimelberg
  • R. S. Bourke

Abstract

In the biosphere, chloride is the major extracellular anion, balancing the predominant cation sodium as well as other positive ions. Hence, Cl ions are most likely to accompany net movements of cations to preserve electrical neutrality and will therefore have a major role in regulation of cell volume. Chloride is also likely to be the major anion involved in carrying current during potential changes in excitable tissues. However, the electrical driving force and the permeability of an ion are as important as the amount of the ion present in determining the magnitude of its contribution to the total current flow. Also, such changes need not involve significant net movements of ions. Conversely, cell membrane potentials will determine how an ion is distributed between the cell and the extracellular fluid if the ion is both reasonably permeant and there is no active transport of the ion. Most cells in the CNS have large, inside-negative membrane potentials, and for an anion, this will result in low intracellular concentrations. Table I, taken from Tower,1 shows the total content of the major anions and cations of mammalian brain. The aim of this chapter will be to review what is currently known about how the major inorganic anions, Cl and HCO3 , are distributed among the different compartments of the nervous system, how they are transported among these different cellular compartments, and how this distribution and transport affect cell function.

Keywords

Membrane Potential Carbonic Anhydrase Brain Slice Anion Transport Serosal Surface 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. K. Kimelberg
    • 1
  • R. S. Bourke
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Neurosurgery, and Department of Biochemistry and AnatomyAlbany Medical CollegeAlbanyUSA
  2. 2.Division of NeurosurgeryAlbany Medical CollegeAlbanyUSA

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