Mechanical Properties of Insulating Plastic Foams at Low Temperatures

  • R. M. McClintock
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 4)

Abstract

Expanded plastics have found considerable use as cryogenic insulation in applications where only moderate thermal efficiency is required, especially where it is convenient for the insulation to be self-supporting or to provide support to other structures. The thermal gradient in which they see service, however, induces thermal stresses which can be great enough to cause failure of the insulation structure if the design does not allow for the effects of the characteristically high thermal contraction and relatively low tensile strength of these materials.

Keywords

Polystyrene Foam Plastic Cell Wall Epoxy Foam Expanded Plastic Rigid Epoxy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    E. H. Brown, Thermal Stresses in Cylindrical Shells Used for Cryogenic Insulation, National Bureau of Standards Laboratory Note, not published.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    J. E. Schrodt et al., A Comparison of Insulating Materials, National Bureau of Standards Laboratory Note, not published.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    A. P. Poorman, Strength of Materials, McGraw-Hill Book Company (1945).Google Scholar
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    R. J. Corruccini, Properties of Materials at Low Temperatures, Chemical Engineering Progress, Part 3, 53, 8, August 1957.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Koppers Co. Inc., Koppers Expandable Polystyrene. M. H. Nickerson, DeBell and Richardson, Inc., private correspondence.Google Scholar
  6. 7.
    Dow Chemical Co., Styrofoam (Expanded Polystyrene), (1955).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1960

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. M. McClintock
    • 1
  1. 1.CEL National Bureau of StandardsBoulderUSA

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