Transient Phenomena Associated with the Pressurized Discharge of a Cryogenic Liquid from a Closed Vessel

  • J. A. Clark
  • G. J. Van Wylen
  • S. K. Fenster
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 5)

Abstract

The work reported in this paper was undertaken as part of a general research program directed at a study of the heat-mass transfer processes associated with the pressurized discharge of a cryogenic liquid from a closed vessel. The fluids used were liquid nitrogen pressurized with gaseous nitrogen at approximately 50 psia and inlet temperatures ranging from -299 to +111°F. Some of the initial results were given at a previous conference [1]. Other work is reported in a companion paper [2].

Keywords

Heat Flux Heat Transfer Coefficient Wall Temperature Liquid Region Constant Heat Flux 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    G. J. VanWylen, S.K. Fenster, H. Merte Jr., and W. A. Warren, “Pressurized-discharge of liquid nitrogen from an uninsulated tank,” 1358 Cryogenic Engineering Conference Proceedings.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    S. K. Fenster, G. J. Van Wylen, and J.A. Clark, “Transient phenomena associated with the pressurization of liquid nitrogen boiling at constant heat flux” present volume, p. 226.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    W.H. McAdams, Heat Transmission, 3rd ed., McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York (1954).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    F. B. Hildebrand, Advanced Calculus for Engineers, Prentice-Hall, Inc., New York (1949).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    H. S. Carslaw and J. C. Jaeger, Conduction of Heat in Solids, Clarendon Press, Oxford (1950).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1960

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. A. Clark
    • 1
  • G. J. Van Wylen
    • 1
  • S. K. Fenster
    • 2
  1. 1.University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  2. 2.Sperry Gyroscope CompanyGreat NeckUSA

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