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Mechanical Property Testing Techniques for the Cryogenic Temperature Range

  • F. R. Schwartzberg
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 8)

Abstract

This paper reviews the techniques used for mechanical property testing in the cryogenic temperature range. In discussing testing concepts, both simple and elaborate techniques will be presented. Critical remarks regarding equipment and techniques should not be construed as malicious comments, since many reasons exist, of courses, for systems that are considered simple or crude, Among these factors are: a desire for early capability, a minimum or temporary requirement, and cost.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1963

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. R. Schwartzberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Martin CompanyDenverUSA

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