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Cryogenic Pumping and Space Simulation

  • E. L. Garwin
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 8)

Abstract

When the monetary and political consequences of abortive or marginally successful space flights are considered, it becomes evident that preliminary research and proof testing under conditions encountered in the space environment are highly desirable. The recognized phenomena of material composition changes, optical property modification, surface friction enhancemen, cold welding, weight loss, sputtering, and many others may be studied under controlled conditions over extended periods of time by direct measurement in proper space environment simulators. By appropriate variation of the individual conditions, the effects on a particular phenomenon may be determined, with the concomitant possibility of accelerating effects experienced during space flights. New or unexpected phenomena may be discovered and investigated without risking a space mission to do so.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1963

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. L. Garwin
    • 1
  1. 1.Clauser Technology CorporationTorranceUSA

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