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Solid Formation in Flowing Cryogenic Fluids

  • D. B. Chelton
  • B. W. Birmingham
  • J. W. Dean
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 8)

Abstract

The very low pressures encountered at high altitudes may result In problems in the utilization of cryogenic propellants due to the formation of solids at points of leakage and vents. Liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen, when expanded below their triple-point pressures (1.1 mm and 56 mm, respectively) will form solid and metastable liquid with a reduction of temperature. The solid, if deposited in critical areas, may obstruct or retard flow and thereby cause a malfunction in the propellant system.

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References

  1. 1.
    S. C. Mullins, B. S. Kirk, and W. T. Ziegler, “The Thermodynamic Properties of Oxygen from 20° to 100°K,” Tech. Rept. No. 2, Project No. A-593, Engineering Experiment Station, Georgia Institute of Technology. NBS Contract CST-7339.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    S. C. Mullins, W. T. Ziegler, and B. S. Kirk, “The Thermodynamic Properties of Parahydrogen from 1° to 20°K,” Tech. Rept. No. 1, Project No. A-593, Engineering Experiment Station, Georgia Institute of Technology. NBS Contract CST-7339.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1963

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. B. Chelton
    • 1
  • B. W. Birmingham
    • 1
  • J. W. Dean
    • 1
  1. 1.CEL National Bureau of StandardsBoulderUSA

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