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A Refrigeration System Incorporating a Low-Capacity, High-Speed, Gas-Bearing-Supported Expansion Turbine

  • D. B. Mann
  • H. Sixsmith
  • W. A. Wilson
  • B. W. Birmingham
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 8)

Abstract

The purpose of this report is to describe the application of previously developed gas-bearing principles [1,2,3] to a turbine expander operating as part of a small-capacity helium refrigeration system. This refrigeration system, chosen for its simplicity, uses helium gas as the refrigeration medium and bearing supply, and is capable of providing a continuous refrigeration sink at 4.2°K.

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References

  1. 1.
    B. W. Birmingham, H. Sixsmith, and W. A. Wilson, Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 7, K. D. Timmerhaus (ed.), Plenum Press, New York (1962), p. 30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    H. Sixsmith, W. A. Wilson, and B.W. Birmingham, “Load-Carrying Capacity of Gas-Lubricated Bearings with Inherent Orifice Compensation Using Nitrogen and Helium Gas,” NBS Tech. Note 115, PB 161616 (Aug. 1961).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    H. Sixsmith, “The Theory and Design of a Gas-Lubricated Bearing of High Stability,” Proceedings of First International Symposium on Gas-Lubricated Bearings, ACR-49, Office of Naval Research, Washington, D.C. (Oct. 1959).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    R. B. Scott, Cryogenic Engineering, D. Van Nostrand Co., Inc., Princeton, N.J. (1959).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1963

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. B. Mann
    • 1
  • H. Sixsmith
    • 1
  • W. A. Wilson
    • 1
  • B. W. Birmingham
    • 1
  1. 1.CEL National Bureau of StandardsBoulderUSA

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