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The Thermodynamic Properties of Parahydrogen from 1° to 22°K

  • J. C. Mullins
  • W. T. Ziegler
  • B. S. Kirk
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 8)

Abstract

The purpose of this work was to obtain a consistent set of thermodynamic properties for parahydrogen from 22°K to a temperature at which the vapor pressure of solid hydrogen is about 10-6 mm Hg. These data were used to construct a temperature-entropy diagram, having lines of constant enthalpy H, constant pressure P, constant volume V, and constant quality x. This diagram is shown in Fig. 1.* Such a chart should prove useful in the engineering analysis of processes involving the venting of saturated liquid and gaseous parahydrogen into space environments in which pressures as low as 10-6 mm Hg may be encountered. Since the calculations were performed by an automatic digital computer, extension of the calculations to 1°K was carried out.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1963

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. C. Mullins
    • 1
  • W. T. Ziegler
    • 1
  • B. S. Kirk
    • 1
  1. 1.Georgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA

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