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The Radiative Properties of Cryodeposits at 77°K

  • T. M. Cunningham
  • R. L. Young
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 8)

Abstract

In the space environment, the thermal radiation emitted by and reflected from a space vehicle does not return to the vehicle. Correct simulation of these conditions during environmental testing in space chambers requires that the amount of radiation incident upon the vehicle because of the presence of the chamber walls be minimized. Normally the chamber walls are cooled to about liquid-nitrogen temperature, hence, the amount of radiation emitted by the walls to the vehicle is small However, the amount of radiation reflected from the walls to the vehicle may be large, Thus for correct simulation it is important that the reflectance of the chamber walls be small. Additionally, the radiative properties of chamber surfaces must be known to evaluate the refrigeration loads for the predictions of chamber performance.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1963

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. M. Cunningham
    • 1
  • R. L. Young
    • 1
  1. 1.ARO, Inc.TullahomaUSA

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