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Optimization of a Cryogenic Refrigerator Heat Exchanger

  • W. E. Gifford
  • A. Acharya
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 13)

Abstract

Any cryogenic refrigerator which uses thermal regenerators, such as the Stirling cycle [1–4], Gifford-McMahon cycle [5,6] and Pulse Tube refrigeration devices [7–9] requires, in addition to the thermal regenerator, a small, constant-temperature heat exchanger at the cold end to adsorb the useful refrigeration heat load.

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References

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    J. W. L. Köhler and C. D. Jonkers, Philips Tech. Review, 69:16 (1954),Google Scholar
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    J. W. L. Köhler, in: Progress in Cryogenics, Vol. 1, Heywood and Co., London (1960), p. 43.Google Scholar
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    G. Prast, in: International Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Plenum Press, New York (1965), p. 40.Google Scholar
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    W. E. Gifford and H. O. McMahon, “A Low Temperature Heat Pump,” Proc. of 10th International Congress of Refrigeration, Intern. Inst. Refrigeration, Copenhagen (1959), p. 100.Google Scholar
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    W. E. Gifford, Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 11, Plenum Press, New York (1966), p. 152.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    W. E. Gifford and R. C. Longsworth, Trans ASME, 86B(3):264 (1964).Google Scholar
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    W. E. Gifford and R. C. Longsworth, in: International Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Plenum Press, New York (1965), p. 69.Google Scholar
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    W. E. Gifford and G. H. Kyanka, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 12, Plenum Press, New York (1967), p. 619.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. E. Gifford
    • 1
  • A. Acharya
    • 1
  1. 1.Syracuse UniversitySyracuseUSA

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