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Tensile Properties and Notch Toughness of Aluminum Alloys at -452°F in Liquid Helium

  • J. G. Kaufman
  • K. O. Bogardus
  • E. T. Wanderer
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 13)

Abstract

The mechanical properties of aluminum alioys have been well documented at temperatures down to -320°F for many years [1–3] and, within the past few years, a reasonable amount of information has been developed at -423°F with liquid hydrogen as the cooling agent [4–7]. Nevertheless, little has been known of the properties of aluminum alloys at -452°F, the temperature of liquid helium; only one alloy, 5083, has been thoroughly evaluated prior to 1966 [8].

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. G. Kaufman
    • 1
  • K. O. Bogardus
    • 1
  • E. T. Wanderer
    • 1
  1. 1.Aluminum Company of AmericaNew KensingtonUSA

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