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An Equation for the Prediction of Cryogenic Pressurant Requirements for Axisymmetric Propellant Tanks

  • M. Epstein
  • R. E. Anderson
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 13)

Abstract

Engineering interest in cryogenic pressurant requirements is reflected by the appearance of a number of prediction equations and correlations in the literature. They range from the more elementary saturation rule to the empirical equations of Gluck and Kline [1] and the analytic closed-form solutions of the University of Michigan [2], An equation is presented by Epstein [3], based on computations from a generalized pressurization computer program [4,5], for the prediction of total pressurant requirements in cylindrical liquid hydrogen or oxygen tanks pressurized with evaporated propellant or helium, The equation, when compared with data, had a maximum deviation of 12% for a large number of relatively small tank experimental data from several investigators [3,6].

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References

  1. 1.
    D. F. Gluck and J. F. Kline, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol .7, Plenum Press, New York (1962), p. 219.Google Scholar
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    V. S. Arpaci, J. A. Clark, and W. O. Winer, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 6, Plenum Press, New York (1961), p. 310.Google Scholar
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    M. E. Nein, NASA-MSFC; unpublished ellipsoidal tank liquid oxygen pressurization data received through personal communication.Google Scholar
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    D. H. Liebenberg, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, University of California; unpublished spherical tank liquid hydrogen pressurization data received through personal communication; continuation of effort described in [13].Google Scholar
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    North American Aviation (SD) pressurization data obtained from tests in a static, full-scale Saturn S-ÏI propellant tank configuration (to be published).Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Epstein
    • 1
  • R. E. Anderson
    • 2
  1. 1.RocketdyneCanoga ParkUSA
  2. 2.Space DivisionNorth American Aviation, Inc.DowneyUSA

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