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Studies of Venous Blood Pyruvate and Lactate Levels During Oral and Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Tests in Women Receiving Oral Contraceptives

  • J. W. H. Doar
  • V. Wynn
  • D. G. Cramp

Abstract

Pyruvate occupies a key position in intermediary metabolism being situated on both the glycolytic and gluconeogenetic pathways. Unlike the majority of the phosphorylated intermediairies, appreciable amounts of pyruvate diffuse across cell membranes and it is assumed that blood pyruvate levels to some extent reflect intracellular events.

Keywords

Oral Contraceptive Test Group Blood Lactate Obese Control Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. W. H. Doar
    • 1
  • V. Wynn
    • 1
  • D. G. Cramp
    • 1
  1. 1.Alexander Simpson Laboratory for Metabolic ResearchSt. Mary’s Hospital Medical SchoolLondonUK

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