Advertisement

Coronaviruses pp 159-168 | Cite as

Temperature-Sensitive Mutants of MHV-A59

  • L. S. Sturman
  • C. Eastwood
  • M. F. Frana
  • C. Duchala
  • F. Baker
  • C. S. Ricard
  • S. G. Sawicki
  • K. V. Holmes
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 218)

Abstract

Sequencing of complete coronavirus genomes will soon be accomplished, and the size and locations of all of the viral genes and the amino acid sequence of the gene products will then be apparent. These important advances will be a major aid to understanding the fascinating biology and pathogenesis of this group of viruses. The next goal will be to understand the interactions of viral macromolecules during coronavirus replication, and to identify domains on the viral proteins which are responsible for these molecular interactions.

Keywords

Wild Type Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Complementation Group Mouse Hepatitis Virus Viral Structural Protein 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Frana, M.F., Behnke, J.N., Sturman, L.S., and Holmes, K.V., 1985, Proteolytic cleavage of the E2 glycoprotein of murine coronavirus: Host-dependent differences in proteolytic cleavage and cell fusion, J. Virol., 56: 912.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Haspel, M.V., Lampert, P.W., and Oldstone, M.B.A., 1978, Temperature-sensitive mutants of mouse hepatitis virus produce a high incidence of demyelination, Proc. Natl. Acad Sci., USA, 75: 4033.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Holmes, K.V., Doller, E.W., and Sturman, L.S., 1981, Tunicamycin resistant glycosylation of a coronavirus glycoprotein: Demonstration of a novel type of viral glycoprotein, Virology, 115: 334.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Holmes, K.V., 1984, Assembly of Coronaviridae, Chapter 7, pp. 100–119 in “Assembly of Enveloped RNA Viruses”, M. DuBois-Dalcq, K.V. Holmes, and B. Rentier, eds., Springer-Verlag, Vienna.Google Scholar
  5. Koolen, M.J.M., Osterhaus, A.D.M.E., van Steenis, G., Horzinek, M.C., and van der Zeijst, B.A.M., 1983, Temperature-sensitive mutants of mouse hepatitis virus strain A59: Isolation, characterization and neuropathogenic properties, Virology, 127: 393.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Leibowitz, J.L., DeVries, J.R., and Haspel, M.V., 1982, Genetic analysis of murine hepatitis virus strain JHM, J. Virol., 42: 1080.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Pringle, C.R., 1982, The genetics of vesiculoviruses, Arch. Virol., 72: 1.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Robb, J.A., Bond, C.W., and Leibowitz, J.L., 1979, Pathogenic murine coronaviruses. III. Biological and biochemical characterization of temperature-sensitive mutants of JHMV, Virology, 94: 385.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Siddell, S., 1983. Coronavirus JHM: coding assignments of subgenomic mRNAs. J. gen Virol. 64: 113PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Skinner, M.A., Ebner, D., and Siddell, S.G., 1985, Coronavirus MHV-JHM mRNA 5 has a sequence arrangement which potentially allows translation of a second, downstream open reading frame. J. gen. Virol., 66: 581.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Skinner, M.A., and Siddell, S.G., 1985, Coding sequence of coronavirus MHV-JHM mRNA 4, J. gen Virol., 66: 593.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Sturman, L.S., and Holmes, K.V., 1983, The molecular biology of coronaviruses, Adv. Virus Res., 28: 35.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Sturman, L.S., Ricard, C.S., and Holmes, K.V., 1985, Proteolytic cleavage of the E2 glycoprotein of murine coronavirus: Activation of cell-fusing activity of virions by trypsin and separation of two different 90K cleavage fragments, J. Virol., 56: 904PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. S. Sturman
    • 1
  • C. Eastwood
    • 1
  • M. F. Frana
    • 2
  • C. Duchala
    • 2
  • F. Baker
    • 1
  • C. S. Ricard
    • 1
  • S. G. Sawicki
    • 3
  • K. V. Holmes
    • 2
  1. 1.New York State Department of HealthWadsworth Center for Laboratories and ResearchAlbanyUSA
  2. 2.Uniformed Services University of the Health SciencesBethesdaUSA
  3. 3.Medical College of OhioToledoUSA

Personalised recommendations