Advertisement

RNA Recombination of Coronavirus

  • James G. Keck
  • Shinji Makino
  • Lisa H. Soe
  • John O. Fleming
  • Stephen A. Stohlman
  • Michael M. C. Lai
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 218)

Summary

We have previously shown that Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) can undergo RNA-RNA recombination at a very high frequency (S. Makino, et al., J. Virol. 57, 729-737, 1986). To better define the mechanism of RNA recombination, we have performed additional crosses involving different MHV strains. We have obtained recombinant viruses with multiple cross-overs. The isolation of such recombinants further indicates the high frequency of coronavirus RNA recombination. By using cell fusion as a selection marker, we have also obtained recombinants between MHV-2 and A59 strains. Some of these recombinants have cross-overs in the 3′-end genes of the genome, thus demonstrating that recombination could occur along the entire genome. Finally, we have obtained recombinants by selecting with neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. These recombinants have cross-overs within gene C which encodes the peplomer protein. The genetic structure of these recombinants allowed us to determine the important domains of the peplomer proteins.

Keywords

Leader Region Mouse Hepatitis Virus Murine Coronavirus Subgenomic mRNAs Powerful Genetic Tool 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Fields, B.N. (1981) Genetics of reovirus. Curr. Top. Microbiol. Immunol. 91, 1–24.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Lai, M.M.C., Baric, R.S., Makino, S., Keck, J.G., Egbert, J. Leibowitz, J.L., and Stohlman, S.A. (1985). Recombination between non-segmented RNA genomes of murine coronaviruses. J. Virol. 56, 449–456.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Lai, M.M.C., Patton, C.D., Baric, R.S., and Stohlman, S.A. (1983). Presence of leader sequences in the mRNA of mouse hepatitis virus. J. Virol. 46, 1027–1033.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Lai, M.M.C., Patton, C.D., and Stohlman, S.A. (1982). Replication of mouse hepatitis virus: negative-stranded RNA and replicative form RNA are of genomic length. J. Virol. 44, 487–492.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Lai, M.M.C., and Stohlman, S.A. (1978). RNA of mouse hepatitis virus. J. Virol. 26, 235–242.Google Scholar
  6. Lai, M.M.C., and Stohlman, S.A. (1981). Comparative analysis of RNA genomes of mouse hepatitis viruses. J. Virol. 38, 661–670.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Leibowitz, J.L., DeVries, F.R., and Haspel, M.V. (1982). Genetic analysis of murine hepatitis virus strain JHM. J. Virol. 42, 1080–1087.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Makino, S., Keck, J.G., Stohlman, S.A., and Lai, M.M.C. (1986). High frequency RNA recombination of murine coronaviruses. J. Virol. 56, 729–737.Google Scholar
  9. Makino, S., Taguchi, F., Hirano, N., and Fujiwara, K. (1984). Analysis of genomic and intracellular viral RNAs of small plaque mutants of mouse hepatitis virus, JH. strain. Virology 139, 138–151.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Wege, H., Muller, A., and ter Muelen, V. (1978). Genomic RNA of the murine coronavirus 3HM. J. Gen. Virol. 41, 217–228.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • James G. Keck
    • 1
  • Shinji Makino
    • 1
  • Lisa H. Soe
    • 1
  • John O. Fleming
    • 1
  • Stephen A. Stohlman
    • 1
  • Michael M. C. Lai
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Microbiology and Neurology, School of MedicineUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

Personalised recommendations