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Carcinogenic and Mutagenic N-Nitroso Compounds

  • William Lijinsky
Part of the Chemical Mutagens book series

Abstract

N-nitroso compounds have been known since about 1860 when the preparation of dimethylnitrosamine was first described. They can be formed easily by interaction of secondary or tertiary amino compounds with nitrous acid or other nitrosating agents. Their toxic effect has been alluded to for some time(1) but their specific action was not described until 1954, when Magee and Barnes reported toxic liver injury by dimethylnitrosamine in man(2) and rats and carcinogenesis by the same compound in rats.(3) The first report of mutagenicity of a nitroso compound referred to methylnitrosonitroguanidine.(4) Since then there has been growing interest in the toxicology of N-nitroso compounds and in their chemistry and biochemistry. In spite of all of this activity, however, there is no satisfactory explanation of the biological actions of N-nitroso compounds.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • William Lijinsky
    • 1
  1. 1.Biology DivisionOak Ridge National LaboratoryOak RidgeUSA

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