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Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses in Human Cerebrospinal Fluid

  • Benjamin Rix Brooks
  • Robert L. Hirsch
  • Patricia K. Coyle
Chapter

Abstract

The subarachnoid space in the central nervous system (CNS) is a relatively closed compartment112 filled with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) containing immunocompetent cells and their chemical products. 56,261,403,556,580 Anaiysis of the cellular and humoral immune response of the cellular elements in this compartment bears a direct relationship to the activity of these cellular elements in the parenchyma of the CNS. However, little is known about the kinetics of immune responsiveness of immunocompetent cells in CSF or the trafficking of such cells through the CSF compartment in man. More emphasis has been placed on the products of these cells, particularly immunoglobulins.556,580 We will present an analysis of the kinetics of appearance and disappearance of subpopulations of immunocompetent cells in CSF during several disease states in man, the correlation of properties of these cells, when studied, with these disease states, and an analysis of the soluble products of these cells in human CSF during these disease states.

Keywords

Multiple Sclerosis Herpes Simplex Synovial Fluid Myelin Basic Protein Bacterial Meningitis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin Rix Brooks
    • 1
  • Robert L. Hirsch
    • 2
  • Patricia K. Coyle
    • 3
  1. 1.Departments of Neurology and Medical MicrobiologyUniversity of Wisconsin School of MedicineMadisonUSA
  2. 2.Departments of Neurology and MicrobiologyUniversity of Maryland School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.Department of NeurologyState University of New York at StonybrookStonybrookUSA

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