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Cancer Chemoprevention with Vitamin A and Beta-Carotene in Populations at High-Risk for Lung Cancer

  • G. S. Omenn
  • G. Goodman
  • L. Rosenstock
  • S. Barnhart
  • B. Lund
  • M. Thornquist
  • P. Feigl

Abstract

Vitamin A, beta-carotene, and synthetic retinoids have attracted wide interest as premising chemopreventive agents, based on work in rodents and in cultured cells and organs, and low dietary intake or low serum levels of vitamin A or beta-carotene have been associated with high risk for lung cancer (1–4). Even if the data were stronger, observational epidemiological studies cannot establish whether or not changing the vitamin A status of specific individuals or groups of individuals would alter their subsequent cancer risk. The hypothesis that increasing retinoid intake in humans would reduce the risk of lung cancer must be tested in humans. For both practical and ethical reasons, such studies should be undertaken initially among those at highest risk.

Keywords

Prevention Trial Asbestos Exposure Asbestos Fiber Retinyl Palmitate Synthetic Retinoid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. S. Omenn
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. Goodman
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. Rosenstock
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. Barnhart
    • 1
    • 2
  • B. Lund
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Thornquist
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. Feigl
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Cancer Prevention Research UnitFred Hutchinson Cancer Research CenterSeattleUSA
  2. 2.University of Washington School of Public Health and Community MedicineSeattleUSA

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