Advertisement

Exercise Training Effects on Mitochondrial Enzyme Activity, Ubiquinones and Vitamin E

  • Johanna Lang
  • Kishorchandra Gohil
  • Laurie Rothfuss
  • Lester Packer

Abstract

It is well-known that endurance exercise training leads to an overall increase in the oxidative capacity of oxidative type (red) skeletal muscles through increased biogenesis of mitochondria (1, 2). While overall muscle mitochondrial content increases, the mitochondrial lipid/protein ratio and the specific activities of mitochondrial enz37mes remain constant (2). Besides their known physiological function as providers of ATP through oxygen reduction, mitochondria are also potential sites of oxygen free radical formation by erroneous, incomplete electron transfer to oxygen, most probably at the site of ubiquinone oxidoreduction (3). Mitochondrial free radical production is likely to increase with the massive increase in oxygen consumption during physical activity. This suggests that exercise should result in an increased demand on antioxidant systems to respond to the increased production of oxygen-derived and other free radicals.

Keywords

Endurance Training Mitochondrial Content Endurance Exercise Training Mitochondrial Enzyme Activity Oxygen Free Radical Formation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    J.O. Holloszy and F.W. Booth, Biochemical adaptation to endurance exercise in muscle, Annu. Rev. Physiol. 38, 237–291 (1976).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    K.I.A. Davies, L. Packer, and G.A. Brooks, Biochemical adaptations of mitochondria, muscle, and whole animal respiration to endurance training. Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 209, 538–553 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    A. Boveris and E. Cadenas, A.O.M. Stoppani, Role of ubiquinone in the mitochondrial generation of hydrogen peroxide, Biochem. J. 156, 435–444 (1976).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    J. Lang, K. Gohil, and L. Packer, Simultaneous determination of tocopherols, ubiquinols, and ubiquinones in blood, plasma, tissue homogenates and subcellular fractions. Anal. Biochem. 157, 1016–116 (1986).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    K. Gohil, L. Oacker, B. DeLumen, G.A. Brooks and S.E. Terblanche, Vitamin E deficiency and vitamin C supplements: exercise and mitochondrial oxidation, J. Appl. Physiol. 60(6), 1986–1991, (1986).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    L. Bukowiecki, J. Lupien, N. Follea, A. Paradis, D. Richard, and J. Leblanc, Mechanism of enhanced lipolysis in adipose tissue of exercise-trained rats. Am. J. Physiol. (Endocrinol. Metabol. 2) E422-E429 (1980).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Johanna Lang
    • 1
  • Kishorchandra Gohil
    • 1
  • Laurie Rothfuss
    • 1
  • Lester Packer
    • 1
  1. 1.Membrane Bioenergetics Group, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Department of Physiology/AnatomyUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

Personalised recommendations