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Reactive Oxygen Species are Mutagenic to Mammalian Cells

  • Abraham W. Hsie

Abstract

Radiation biologists have proposed that various reactive oxygen species (referred to hereafter as reactive oxygens) which are produced during reactions between radiation and the biological system, are largely responsible for the adverse biological effects of radiations (1). Recently, reactive oxygens have been implicated in the toxic action of numerous chemicals (2).

Keywords

Reactive Oxygen Species Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Chinese Hamster Ovary Ethyl Methanesulfonate Adverse Biological Effect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Abraham W. Hsie
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of Texas Medical BranchGalvestonUSA

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