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The genus Streptococcus

  • J. M. Hardie
  • R. A. Whiley
Chapter
Part of the The Lactic Acid Bacteria book series (LAAB, volume 2)

Abstract

The genus Streptococcus consists of Gram-positive, spherical or ovoid cells that are typically arranged in chains or pairs. These cocci are facultatively anaerobic, non-sporing, catalase-negative, homofermentative, and have complex nutritional requirements. Many of the known species are parasitic in man or other animals and some are important pathogens (Jones, 1978; Hardie, 1986; Colman, 1990). Chain-forming cocci were observed in wounds by Billroth (1874) and he applied the term ‘Streptococcus’ to such organisms to designate their morphological arrangement (Jones, 1978). A few years later, Rosenbach (1884) first used the word Streptococcus in the generic sense and described the species Streptococcus pyogenes which is now the type species of the genus. This species was originally isolated from suppurative lesions in humans. Subsequently, in early studies by Nocard and Mollereau (1887), Schütz (1887, 1888) and Talamon (1883) — cited by Colman (1990) — several other varieties of streptococci were isolated from different sources, including S. agalactiae from cows with mastitis and streptococci from both equine and human cases of pneumonia.

Keywords

Lactic Acid Bacterium Streptococcus Mutans Streptococcal Infection Systematic Bacteriology Oral Streptococcus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • J. M. Hardie
  • R. A. Whiley

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