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Coronaviruses pp 437-442 | Cite as

Phenotypic and Functional Characterization of CD4+ T-Cells Infiltrating the Central Nervous System of Rats Infected with Coronavirus MHV IV

  • H. Imrich
  • S. Schwender
  • A. Hein
  • R. Dörries
Chapter
  • 400 Downloads
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 342)

Abstract

Mouse hepatitis virus strain JHM, a neurotropic member of coronaviridae, causes neurological diseases in rats after intracerebral inoculation. The course of the infection depends on the rat strain, the age of the animals and the type of virus used. After infection at the age of 3 weeks BN rats remain clinically healthy. In contrast, 40% of LEW rats die within the first week past infection, when inoculated at the same age. Most of the surviving animals develop neurological signs with increasing severity up to the second week past infection, followed by complete convalescence 1,2,3.

Keywords

Keyhole Limpet Hemocyanine Central Nervous System Tissue Past Infection Intracerebral Inoculation Nylon Wool 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Imrich
    • 1
  • S. Schwender
    • 1
  • A. Hein
    • 1
  • R. Dörries
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für Virologie und ImmunbiologieUniversität WürzburgWürzburgGermany

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