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Growth of Crystals of Beryllium Oxides and Silicates Using Fluxes

  • G. V. Bukin
Chapter
Part of the Growth of Crystals book series (GROC, volume 19)

Abstract

The increasing demands of modern science and industry on new materials make it imperative to study the synthesis and growth of crystals with valuable physical properties. Thus, whereas the needs of science and technology are usually focused on problems of growing crystals of high optical quality with the minimal number of defects, the goals of the jewelry industry require synthetic analogs of natural minerals traditionally used as gems that have properties and even defects similar to those of the natural specimens.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York  1993

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  • G. V. Bukin

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