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AIDS in the Intensive Care Unit

  • David M. Forrest
  • Carlos Zala
  • Marianne Harris
  • Peter Phillips
  • James A. Russell
  • Julio S. G. Montaner
Chapter
  • 339 Downloads

Abstract

Since Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) was first recognized, it has been a leading cause of death among young people in the industrialized world and has had devastating effects in developing nations [1]. With the introduction of modern antiretroviral therapy, there has been a marked decline in the incidence of AIDS among treated Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Since 1995, stabilization in the incidence of AIDS-related opportunistic infections in industrialized countries has been followed by a reduction in the rate of new AIDS case and AIDS-related mortality. These changes are thought to be due to the introduction of highly active antiretroviral combination regimens [2–5]. Although the admission rates of HIV-infected persons to the intensive care unit (ICU) are likely to have fallen in conjunction with a decline in the AIDS case-rate, there are no data to substantiate this.

Keywords

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Intensive Care Unit Admission Acute Respiratory Failure Cryptococcal Meningitis Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • David M. Forrest
  • Carlos Zala
  • Marianne Harris
  • Peter Phillips
  • James A. Russell
  • Julio S. G. Montaner

There are no affiliations available

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