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Specific Cleavage of 28S Ribosomal RNA in Murine Coronavirus-Infected Cells

  • Sangeeta Banerjee
  • Sungwhan An
  • Shinji Makino
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 494)

Abstract

Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), a prototypic Coronavirus, causes gastrointestinal and upper respiratory tract illnesses in animals and man. The 32 kb-long MHV genome is a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA (Lai et al 1981, Lee et al 1991) that encodes 11 open reading frames, expressed through the production of a genomic-size and six to eight species of subgenomic mRNAs (Lai et al 1981). Genomic-size mRNA encodes the 5’-most 22 kb-long gene 1, which encodes the RNA Polymerase function (Lee et al 1991). MHV contains three envelope proteins, S, M and E proteins. S protein binds to the Coronavirus receptor (Dveskler et al 1991). M and E proteins are important for the formation of the MHV envelope (Kim et al 1997).

Keywords

Mouse Hepatitis Virus Respiratory Tract Illness Host Protein Synthesis Subgenomic mRNAs Viral RNase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sangeeta Banerjee
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sungwhan An
    • 1
  • Shinji Makino
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and Institute of Cellular and Molecular BiologyThe University of Texas at AustinAustinUSA
  2. 2.Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyThe University of Texas Medical BranchGalvestonUSA

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