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Acute CNS Infection is Insufficient to Mediate Chronic T Cell Retention

  • Norman W. Marten
  • Maureen Hohman
  • Stephen A. Stohlman
  • Roscoe D. Atkinson
  • David R. Hinton
  • Cornelia C. Bergmann
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 494)

Abstract

CD8+ T cells control infection by the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) by eliminating infectious virus and reducing CNS pathology (Stohlman et al. 1995). Virus-specific CTL in BALB/c mice (H-2d) respond almost exclusively to a single immunodominant epitope in the nucleocapsid (N) protein (Bergmann et al. 1993). During acute JHMV infection, CD8+ T cells account for up to 40% of CNS mononuclear cells (MNC) (Bergmann et al. 1999). Following viral clearance, virus specific CD8+ T cells remain in CNS for several weeks (Bergmann et al. 1999).

Keywords

Spinal Cord Infected Mouse Infectious Virus Viral Persistence Cell Retention 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norman W. Marten
    • 1
  • Maureen Hohman
  • Stephen A. Stohlman
    • 2
    • 3
  • Roscoe D. Atkinson
    • 1
  • David R. Hinton
    • 1
  • Cornelia C. Bergmann
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Departments of PathologyUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Molecular Microbiology and ImmunologyUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Departments of Neurology, Keck School of MedicineUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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