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The CXC Chemokines IP-10 and Mig are Essential in Host Defense Following Infection with a Neurotropic Coronavirus

  • M. T. Liu
  • B. P. Chen
  • P. Oertel
  • M. J. Buchmeier
  • T. A. Hamilton
  • D. A. Armstrong
  • T. E. Lane
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 494)

Abstract

Chemokines represent an ever-growing family of secreted proteins that function as potent mediators of inflammation (for review, see Luster, 1998). These molecules have been classified depending on the number and spacing of the first two conserved amino terminal cysteine residues into the C, CC, CXC, and CX3C family. Studies have shown that chemokines target specific leukocyte populations during periods of inflammation (Luster, 1998; Lane et al., 2000; Biddison et al., 1998; Kolb et al, 1999). In addition, chemokines have been shown to be prominently expressed following viral infection of the CNS (Lane et al, 1998; Cheret et al., 1997, Asensio and Campbell, 1997; Hoffman et al., 1999). However, the functional significance of chemokine expression within this environment has not been fully defined.

Keywords

Viral Clearance Normal Rabbit Serum Chemokine Expression Chemokine Receptor CXCR3 Mouse Hepatitis Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. T. Liu
    • 1
  • B. P. Chen
    • 1
  • P. Oertel
    • 1
  • M. J. Buchmeier
    • 2
  • T. A. Hamilton
    • 3
  • D. A. Armstrong
    • 3
  • T. E. Lane
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Molecular Biology and BiochemistryUniversity of California at IrvineCaliforniaUSA
  2. 2.The Scripps Research InstituteLa JollaUSA
  3. 3.Department of ImmunologyThe Lerner Research InstituteClevelandUSA

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