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Manchester as a Digital Powerhouse: Governing the ICT-Related Developments

  • Mark DeakinEmail author
  • Fiona Campbell
  • Alasdair Reid
Chapter
Part of the Public Administration and Information Technology book series (PAIT, volume 5)

Abstract

The drive to establish Manchester as a forerunner in the digital economy means the city is now considered the “powerhouse” of the North of England, with salaries for city workers at the highest in the UK outside of London. Despite this, Manchester remains home to some of the most socially and economically deprived communities in the UK: just as those who work in the city earn the highest salaries outside London, those who live in the city earn the lowest salaries of the UK’s Core Cities. Responding to the particular challenge widespread deprivation poses for a city experiencing economic growth, the administration has deployed an entrepreneurial model of urban development, characterized by close partnerships with private organizations and local actors. This chapter explores the governance of the ICT-related developments responsible for transforming Manchester into a “digital powerhouse” and challenges the city’s recently announced “Next Generation Digital Strategy” poses.

Keywords

Digital Divide Service Platform Governance Model Socioeconomic Deprivation Combine Authority 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Engineering and Built EnvironmentEdinburgh Napier UniversityEdinburghUK
  2. 2.Institute for Sustainable ConstructionEdinburgh Napier UniversityEdinburghUK

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