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Tripartite Rules: Rule of Man, Rule by Law and Rule of Law

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter traces the general chronological sequence of China’s rule of man, rule by law, and rule of law experiences. The highlights of the discussion are the imperial China’s blended rule of man and rule by law traditions and the use of rule of law promotion as a nation-building instrument at multiple points of sociopolitical transition in Chinese modern history.

Keywords

Chinese Communist Party Socialist Rule Chinese History Socialist Revolution Chinese Characteristic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Criminology and Criminal JusticeNortheastern UniversityBostonUSA

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