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Chinese Legality

Chapter

Abstract

There is no denial that “legality” can be a contested term. We operationalize the word legality in this book to embody law’s rationale, spirit, and authority.

Keywords

Chinese Communist Party Chinese History Confucian Ethic Chinese Nation Constitutional Democracy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Criminology and Criminal JusticeNortheastern UniversityBostonUSA

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