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Introduction

  • Jeffrey Roy
Chapter
Part of the Public Administration and Information Technology book series (PAIT, volume 2)

Abstract

Governments around the world face are seeking to leverage digital technologies in order to improve operational and democratic governance: there are both promise and peril. The still nascent era of mobility, characterized by the expansion of cloud-computing platforms, social media venues, and smaller and more portable and powerful “smart” devices, challenges many of the traditional structures and values that have come to shape politics, public sector operations, and the changing interface between the two. Macro tensions between centralization and democratization, furthermore, are evident beyond the realm of government throughout much of the world.

Keywords

Public Sector Social Medium Cloud Computing Cloud Provider Public Engagement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey Roy
    • 1
  1. 1.Dalhousie UniversityHalifaxCanada

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