Alteration of Plasma Galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine Level After Irradiation

  • Jun Ma
  • Deping Han
  • Mei Zhang
  • Chun Chen
  • Bingrong Zhang
  • Zhenhuan Zhang
  • Xiaohui Wang
  • Shanmin Yang
  • Yansong Guo
  • Paul Okunieff
  • Lurong Zhang
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 765)

Abstract

Although glycoproteins possess a variety of functional and structural roles in intracellular and intercellular activities, the effect of ionizing radiation (IR) on glycosylation is largely unknown. To explore this effect, we established a sandwich assay in which PHA-L, a phytohaemagglutinin that agglutinates leukocytes, was used as a coating layer to capture glycoproteins containing complex oligosaccharides; the bound glycoproteins were then measured. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 0, 3, 6, or 10 Gy, and the plasma was collected at 6, 12, 18, 24, 48, 72, or 168 h and then analyzed for galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine (Gal/GalNAc) containing proteins. We found that (1) the sandwich assay accurately measured the level of glycoproteins, (2) 6–12 h after IR, the amount of glycoproteins containing GalNAc increased, and (3) at 72 and 168 h, 10 Gy was associated with a decrease in Gal/GalNAc. These IR-induced alterations might relate to the release of glycoproteins into the blood and the damage of the proteins and genes that are related to the glycosylation process.

Keywords

Galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine Glycosylation Lectins PHA-L Radiation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This project is supported in part by U19 AI067733, RC1AI078519, RC2-AI-087580, RC1-AI081274 (NIAID/NIH), and Shands Cancer Center startup funds (University of Florida). We thank Dr. Chihray Liu and his team at UF for ensuring dosimetric accuracy and Kate Casey-Sawicki for editing this manuscript.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jun Ma
    • 1
  • Deping Han
    • 2
  • Mei Zhang
    • 2
  • Chun Chen
    • 2
  • Bingrong Zhang
    • 2
  • Zhenhuan Zhang
    • 2
  • Xiaohui Wang
    • 2
  • Shanmin Yang
    • 2
  • Yansong Guo
    • 2
  • Paul Okunieff
    • 2
  • Lurong Zhang
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Digestive DiseasesZhengzhou UniversityHenanChina
  2. 2.Department of Radiation Oncology, UF Shands Cancer CenterUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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