Theory on Mechanics of Solder Materials

Chapter

Abstract

Chapter 2 reviews the fundamental theory on mechanics of solder materials. As solder materials are subject to high operating temperatures relative to their melting point, the thermo-mechanical deformation response of the solder is dependent on both temperature and strain-rate conditions. Hence, the theory on mechanics of solder materials will focus on elastic-plastic-creep and viscoplastic models for describing the thermo-mechanical deformation response of lead-free solder materials operating over a wide range of temperatures (−40°C to +125°C) and strain rates (0.0001–1,000 s−1).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Mechanical and Aerospace EngineeringNanyang Technological UniversitySingaporeSingapore

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