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RNA Plus Genome that Serves as Messenger RNA: Coronaviruses

  • Yechiel Becker
  • Julia Hadar
Chapter
  • 128 Downloads

Abstract

These viruses (100 nm in diameter) have chracteristically long (12–24 nm), widely spaced, bulbous surface projections (peplomeres), a lipid-containing envelope, and a single-stranded RNA + genome. The virus replicates in the cytoplasm of the infected cell and matures by budding through the intracytoplasmic membranes. Viral inclusion bodies may be seen in the cytoplasm (figure 67): The mechanisms of virus replication are similar to those described for the picorna- and toga virus families.

Keywords

Infectious Bronchitis Virus Mouse Hepatitis Virus Feline Infectious Peritonitis Feline Infectious Peritonitis Virus Murine Hepatitis Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Bibliography

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Recommended Reading

  1. Horzinek, M.e., and Osterhaus, A.D.M.E. The virology and pathogenesis of feline infectious peritonitis. Brief Review. Arch. Virol. 59: 1–15, 1979.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yechiel Becker
    • 1
  • Julia Hadar
  1. 1.Department of Molecular Virology Institute of Microbiology, Faculty of MedicineHebrew University of JerusalemIsrael

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