Advertisement

Discussion

Moderators: G. Opelz, D. W. van Bekkum
  • C. Th. Smit Sibinga
  • P. C. Das
  • G. Opelz
Chapter
Part of the Developments in Hematology and Immunology book series (DIHI, volume 10)

Abstract

Dr. Glassman, with regard to the utility of the cryopreserved platelets, I think the technique that you have described is a feasible one. With regard to the clinical application, I wonder what the use of cryopreserved platelets actually will be. The reason for this is that I can think of two situations where platelets will be needed at a very frequent rate, that is in support of patients undergoing bone-marrow transplantation, and in support of patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy for diseases which are mainly acute leukemias. With regard to the bone-marrow transplantation, there really would be no need for cryopreserved platelets, for as long as an HLA identical sibling is available fresh HLA matched platelets can be used.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bainbridge DR. Eliminations of allogeneic lymphocytes by mice. Immunol Rev 1983; 73: 5–34.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Heslop BF, McNeilage J. Natural cytotoxicity: Early killing of allogeneic lymphocytes in rats. Immunol Rev 1983; 73: 35–52.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Rolstad B, Ford WL. The rapid elimination of allogeneic lymphocytes: Relationship to establish mechanisms of immunity and to lymphocyte traffic. Immunol Rev 1983; 73: 87–114.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Birkeland SA. Malignant tumors in renal transplant patients; the Scandia transplant material. Cancer 1983; 51: 1571–5.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Th. Smit Sibinga
    • 1
  • P. C. Das
    • 1
  • G. Opelz
    • 2
  1. 1.Red Cross Blood Bank Groningen-DrentheThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Ruprecht Karls UniversityHeidelbergGermany

Personalised recommendations