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The Role of Autologous Bone Marrow Transplantation in Cancer Treatment

  • G. L. Phillips
Chapter
Part of the Developments in Hematology and Immunology book series (DIHI, volume 10)

Abstract

Marrow transplantation is a method to reduce the hematological toxicity of ablative cytotoxic therapy; the immunologic problems of allogeneic marrow transplantation are avoided by using syngeneic marrow. Because identical twinning is rare, syngeneic marrow transplantation can be of chief benefit as an idealized model for autologous transplantation, a marrow source of ready availablity. The primary problem associated with syngeneic marrow transplantation for treating malignancy is not related to the marrow per se, but to the inability of the pretransplant ablative regimens to eradicate advanced cancer (1). Therefore the reinoculation of malignant cells in the autologous marrow, although worrisome, is of lesser immediate concern. Nevertheless, efforts to purge the marrow of tumor cells are important, and these efforts should parallel improvements in ablative regimens.

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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1984

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  • G. L. Phillips

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