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Defective Interfering RNA Viruses and the Host-Cell Response

  • John J. Holland
  • S. Ian T. Kennedy
  • Bert L. Semler
  • Charlotte L. Jones
  • Laurent Roux
  • Elizabeth A. Grabau
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter will emphasize recently derived knowledge concerning the nature of defective interfering (DI) particles of RNA animal viruses, their biological origins and functions, and their involvement in long-term persistent infections. We will not attempt to review all of the DI literature, and we will confine ourselves to DI particles of RNA viruses. The previous review by Huang and Baltimore (1977) amply documents the occurrence and behavior of DI particles in a wide variety of DNA and RNA viruses and discusses their biological effects, and a very thorough recent review of rhabdovirus DI particles by Reichmann and Schnitzlein (1978) provides excellent in-depth coverage of many areas not covered by the present chapter as well as some alternate viewpoints of areas which are considered here. We will omit DNA virus DI particles from extensive consideration because of space limitations and because they are generally less well characterized at present.

Keywords

Persistent Infection Rabies Virus Measle Virus Infectious Virus Vesicular Stomatitis Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • John J. Holland
    • 1
  • S. Ian T. Kennedy
    • 1
  • Bert L. Semler
    • 1
  • Charlotte L. Jones
    • 1
  • Laurent Roux
    • 1
  • Elizabeth A. Grabau
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyUniversity of CaliforniaSan Diego La JollaUSA

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