Advertisement

Spatial and Nonspatial Neural Mechanisms Underlying Tactile Spatial Discrimination

  • Kenneth O. Johnson
  • John R. Phillips
Chapter
Part of the Wenner-Gren Center International Symposium Series book series (EMISS, volume 12)

Abstract

This paper is concerned with a series of psychophysical and neurophysiological investigations aimed at understanding tactile spatial discrimination and its underlying neural mechanisms. Two aspects of those studies are discussed here. They are (i) the differentiation of surface feature discrimination into two categories, one based on spatial neural coding mechanisms and one based on nonspatial mechanisms, and (ii) the identity of the afferent population(s) that carry the critical spatial information. Because our objective is the study of parallel processing within the somatosensory system, emphasis is placed on identifying and studying those aspects of feature discrimination that are based on spatial (parallel) patterning in the afferent discharge. For this reason, particular attention is given to the interpretation of spatial discrimination as measured in psychophysical experiments and to the criteria that must be satisfied by the neuronal populations that carry the spatially distributed information. The populations considered are the Pacinian (PC), slowly adapting (SA), and quickly adapting (QA) cutaneous mechanoreceptive afferents

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Darian-Smith, I., Davidson, I., Johnson, K.O. (1980). Peripheral neural representation of spatial dimensions of a textured surface moving across the monkey’s finger pad. J. Physiol. ( London ), 309, 135–146Google Scholar
  2. Darian-Smith, I., Kenins, P. (1980). Innervation density of mechanoreceptive fibers supplying glabrous skin of the monkey’s index finger. J. Physiol. ( London ), 309, 147–155PubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Darian-Smith, I., Oke, L.A. (1980). Peripheral neural representation of the spatial frequency of a grating moving across the monkey’s finger pad. J. Physiol. ( London ), 309, 117–133PubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Johansson, R.S., Vallbo, A.B. (1979). Tactile sensibility in the human hand: relative and absolute densities of four types of mechanoreceptive units in glabrous skin. J. Physiol. ( London ), 286, 283–300PubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Johansson, R.S., Vallbo, A.B. (1983). Tactile sensory coding in the glabrous skin of the human hand. Trends Neurosci., 6, 27–32CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Johnson, K.O. (1980). Sensory discrimination: decision process. J. Neurophysiol., 43, 1771–1792PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Johnson, K.O. (1983). Neural mechanisms of tactual form and texture discrimination. Fed. Proc., 42, 2542–2547PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Johnson, K.O., Lamb, G.D. (1981). Neural mechanisms of spatial tactile discrimination: Neural patterns evoked by Braille-like dot patterns in the monkey. J. Physiol. ( London ), 310, 117–144PubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Johnson, K.O., Phillips, J.R. (1981). Tactile spatial resolution: I. Two-point discrimination, gap detection, grating resolution, and letter recognition. J. Neurophysiol., 46, 1177–1191PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Krueger, L.E. (1970). David Katz’s Der Aufbau der Tastwelt (The World of Touch): a synopsis. Percept. Psychophys., 7, 337–341CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Lamb, G.D. (1983a). Tactile discrimination of textured- surfaces: Psychophysical performance measurements in humans. J. Physiol. ( London ), 338, 551–565Google Scholar
  12. Lamb, G.D. (1983b). Tactile discrimination of textured surfaces: Peripheral neural coding in the monkey. J. Physiol. ( London ), 338, 567–587Google Scholar
  13. Lederman, S.J. (1982). The perception of texture by touch. In Tactual Perception: A Sourcebook. (eds. W. Schiff., E. Foulke.,). Cambridge Univ. Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  14. Ochoa J. and Torebjork E. (1983) Sensations evoked by intraneural microstimulation of single mechanoreceptor units innervating the human hand. J. Physiol. (London), in press.Google Scholar
  15. Phillips, J.R., Johnson, K.O. (1981a). Tactile spatial resolution: II. Neural representation of bars, edges, and gratings in monkey afferents. J. Neurophysiol., 46, 1192–1203Google Scholar
  16. Phillips, J.R., Johnson, K.O. (1981b). Tactile spatial resolution: III. A continuum mechanics model of skin predicting mechanoreceptor responses to bars, edges, and gratings. J. Neurophysiol., 46, 1204–1225Google Scholar
  17. Phillips, J.R., Johnson, K.O. (1981b). Tactile spatial resolution: III. A continuum mechanics model of skin predicting mechanoreceptor responses to bars, edges, and gratings. J. Neurophysiol., 46, 1204–1225Google Scholar
  18. Richards, W. (1979) Quantifying sensory channels: generalizing colorimetry to orientation and texture, touch, and tones. Sensory Processes 3: 207–229PubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. Rosenfeld, A., Kak, A.C. (1976). Digital Picture Processing. Academic Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Wenner-Gren Center 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth O. Johnson
    • 1
  • John R. Phillips
    • 1
  1. 1.Bard Laboratories of Neurophysiology, Department of NeuroscienceThe John Hopkins School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA

Personalised recommendations