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Polymers with Ligated Peroxotungstic Units: Organophosphoryl Macroligands for the Catalytic Epoxidation of Alkenes

  • Georges Gelbard
  • David C. Sherrington
  • François Breton
  • Mohamed Benelmoudeni
  • Marie-Thérèse Charreyre
  • Doan Dong
Chapter

Abstract

Epoxidation of olefins is an important way to functionalize hydrocarbons for intermediates in fine chemicals industry [1]. Organic peracids are still used as stoichiometric reagents, but, the use of hydrogen peroxide or organic hydroperoxides appears more convenient and cost effective. These reagents require a transition metal complexes as catalysts; most of them are titanium, vanadium, molybdenum or tungsten based [2].

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Georges Gelbard
    • 1
  • David C. Sherrington
    • 2
  • François Breton
    • 1
  • Mohamed Benelmoudeni
    • 1
  • Marie-Thérèse Charreyre
    • 1
  • Doan Dong
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse-CNRSVilleurbanne CedexFrance
  2. 2.Department of Pure & Applied ChemistryUniversity of StrathclydeGlasgowUK

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