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Multispace Search for Combinatorial Optimization

Chapter

Abstract

Search problems are ubiquitous. The search process is an adaptive process of cumulative performance selection. The structure of a given problem and the environment impose constraints. With the given constraints, a search process transforms a given problem from an initial state to a solution state.

Keywords

Search Space Local Search Directed Acyclic Graph Travel Salesman Problem Travel Salesman Problem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jun Gu
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Electrical and Computer EngineeringUniversity of CalgaryCalgaryCanada

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